Chelsea Roff: A Non-Profit Is A Business Too!

Chelsea Roff Discusses non-profits at BIL Oakland 2016: Recession GenerationChelsea leads Eat Breathe Thrive, a Los Angeles based non-profit focused on treating and preventing eating disorders. Eat Breathe and Thrive began as a free program that Chelsea began at local clinics, as her personal passion, in her free time. After some timely and fortunate media exposure, the opportunity suddenly arose for her to convert this program into a meaningful career as part of a non-profit organization.

Chelsea was one of the featured speakers at BIL Oakland 2016: Recession Generation.  The event served as a skill-sharing event for those interested in social, economic, environmental justice.  In addition, a myriad of revolutionary ideas aimed at promoting greater social, economic and environmental justice like land value taxation were introduced and discussed at length.

In the talk, Chelsea introduces the similarities and differences between non-profit and for-profit businesses. During it, she explains how to effectively manage and fund raise for a non-profit. In particular, Chelsea carefully introduces the potential revenue streams available to non-profits and how the unique status afforded to nonprofits serve to better enable their sustainability, all while satisfying the extensive byzantine legal requirements that the IRS places upon all 501 (c) non-profits. 

About Chelsea Roff (bio)

Chelsea Roff is the Founder and Director of Eat Breathe Thrive, a nonprofit organization that prevents and helps individuals overcome disordered eating and negative body image. An internationally recognized author, speaker, and yoga teacher, Chelsea has spent the past seven years pioneering integrative health programs for people with mental health challenges. Prior to her work in mental health advocacy, Chelsea worked as a researcher in a psychoneuroimmunology laboratory. Her research explored how stress affects mental, emotional, and social health, and how mind-body practices like yoga can improve the outcome of chronic immune diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.

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